Symposium – Wednesday, October 19th

The Annual Conference on South Asia’s Symposium (formerly known as PreConference) offers half and full-day time slots during which presenters and participants can actively discuss more complex topics that would not be suitable to our shorter 105-minute panel format.

All Symposia are open to registered conference attendees – Please see the below schedules to learn more about our exciting lineup this year!

Half Day Symposia run from either 8:30am – 12:15pm or 1:45 – 5:30pm CST.
Full Day Symposia run from 8:30am – 5:30pm CST.

Wednesday, October 19, 2022
All symposia held at Madison Concourse Hotel unless otherwise indicated

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Rethinking Mantra Studies

Rethinking Mantra Studies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Caucus Room

Organizer – Gudrun Buhnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Organizer – Finnian Gerety (Brown University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 AM Welcome and Opening Remarks

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM Panel 1
John Nemec (University of Virginia) What do Mantras Denote?
Srilata Raman (University of Toronto) Encoding and Deciphering the Sectarian Mantra – Śaivasiddhānta and Śrīvaiṣṇava Perspectives from the 14th century
Gudrun Bühnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Visible Mantras in North Indian Vaiṣṇava Traditions
Dheepa Sundaram (University of Denver) Customizing mantras, packaging rituals: How digital apps are incentivized to reconfigure the authenticity and efficacy of Hindu sacred spaces

10:15 – 10:30 AM All-Conference Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel 2
Hillary Langberg (Bard College) Gender, Mantras, and the Rise of the Maṇḍala-focused Praxis in Early Indian Buddhist Tantra (ca. sixth century CE)
Richard Davis (Bard College) The Śaiva Body of Mantras
Ellen Gough (Emory University) Gods and Kings Worship the Jina: Sakalīkaraṇa in Jainism
Respondent: Gudrun Bühnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

12:00 – 1:45 PM Lunch Break

1:45 – 3:15 PM Panel 3
Nell S. Hawley (Harvard University) Mouth to Mouth: Mantras and Intimacy in the Mahābhārata
Marko Geslani (University of South Carolina) Jyotiḥśāstra’s Mantraśāstra
Brian Hatcher (Tufts University) On the early Brahmo mantra
Respondent: Finnian M. Moore-Gerety (Brown University)

3:30 – 3:45 All-Conference Break

3:45 – 5:15 PM Panel 4
Finnian M. Moore Gerety (Brown University) From the Heart to the Head: Towards a Genealogy of the Tantric uccāra
Ayesha A. Irani (University of Massachusetts, Boston) Invoking Nirañjana, the Immaculate Lord: Jikir and Mantra Meditation in Bengali Sufi Praxis
Puninder Singh (University of Michigan) ੴ, ek oṃkār, the bīj mantra of the Sikh tradition, in philosophical and pragmatic perspectives
Respondent: Srilata Raman (University of Toronto)

5:15 – 5:30 PM Concluding Discussion

Age of Vedanta

Age of Vedanta

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Senate Room A

Organizer – Ajay Rao (University of Toronto)


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Panel 1: Vedanta as a System of Knowledge
Paper 1: Bhamati with a View Back: Roads Not Taken
Paper 2: On the Use and Abuse of the Vivarana for Life
Paper 3: Placing Ramanuja within the Srivaisnava Community

10:15– 10:30 AM – Coffee Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel 2: Consolidation and Canon Formation
Paper 1: Citsukha, Anandagiri, and the Formation of the Advaita Vedanta Canon
Paper 2: Philosophy on the Eve of Empire: Vedanta in the Sarvadarsanasamgraha
Paper 3: A Vetted Vaisnavism: Jayatirtha and the Doctrinal Consolidation of Dvaita Vedanta

12:15 – 1:45 PM – Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Panel 3: Institutionalization and Historicization in South India
Paper 1: A Free Thinker among the Vedantins: Appayya Diksita
Paper 2: Appayya’s Sivadvaita and its Antecedents
Paper 3: Non-Partite Sentence Referentiality in Advaita
Paper 4: The Language of Legitimacy in Vedanta Polemics

3.30 – 3.45 PM – Coffee Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM Panel 4: Vedanta in the Colonial and Postcolonial Period
Paper 1: Vedantic Polemics in the Twentieth Century: The Works of N. S. Anantakrishna Sastri
Paper 2: A contemporary Visistadvaita Vedantin between Udayana and Mimamsa: U.T. Viraraghavacarya
Paper 3: Traditional Vedanta in Modernity

Hindu Economicus

Hindu Economicus

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Senate Room B

Organizer – Cassie Adcock (Washington University in St. Louis)


Schedule

Panel 1: 8.30 – 10 am

10 – 10:15 am: Conversation

10:15 – 10:30 am – Coffee Break

Panel 2: 10.30 am – 12.00 pm

12:00 – 12:15 pm: Conversation

12.15 – 01.45 pm – Lunch

Panel 3: 01.45 pm – 3.30 pm

3.30 – 3.45 pm – Coffee Break

3.45 – 4:00 pm: Conversation

Panel 4: 4:00 – 5:00 pm

Critical Contours of Maithili Studies

Critical Contours of Maithili Studies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Conference Room 2

Organizers – Pranav Prakash (Christ Church, University of Oxford)


Schedule

Panel 1: 8.30 – 10.15 am – Disciplinary Histories in Perspective

10:15 – 10:30 am – Coffee Break

Panel 2: 10.30 am – 12.15 pm – Maithili Literary Cultures in History

12.15 – 01.45 pm – Lunch

Panel 3: 01.45 pm – 3.30 pm – Political and Religious Identities of Maithils

3.30 – 3.45 pm – Coffee Break

Panel 4: 3.45 – 5.30 pm – Performative and Visual Cultures in Mithila

New Directions in the Vernacular Millennium: Meter, Prose, and Aesthetics

New Directions in the Vernacular Millennium: Meter, Prose, and Aesthetics

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Conference Room 3

Organizer – Harshita Mruthinti Kamath (Emory University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8.45 am: Opening Remarks

Panel 1: 8.45 – 10.15 am – Maṇipravāḷam and Tamil Vernaculars

10:15 – 10:30 am – Coffee Break

Panel 2: 10.30 am – 12.00 pm –Sanskrit and its Vernacular Interactions

12.00 – 01.45 pm – Lunch

Panel 3: 02:00 pm – 3.30 pm –Kannada and Telugu Vernaculars

3.30 – 3.45 pm – Coffee Break

Panel 4: 4.00 – 5.00 pm – Final Roundtable

On Representing Crisis in South Asian Visual Culture: Intermedial Histories, Strategies, and Methodologies

On Representing Crisis in South Asian Visual Culture: Intermedial Histories, Strategies, and Methodologies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Conference Room 4

Organizer – Anuja Jain (Wesleyan University)


Schedule

Panel 1: 8.30 – 10.15 am – New Cartographies of Crisis: Pandemic to CAA-NRC Protests

10:15 – 10:30 am – Coffee Break

Panel 2: 10.30 am – 12.15 pm – Materialities of Dissent

12.15 – 01.45 pm – Lunch

Panel 3: 02:00 pm – 3.30 pm – Questions of Gender and Caste: Cinematic Mappings and Modalities

3.30 – 3.45 pm – Coffee Break

Panel 4: 3.45 – 5.00 pm – Specters of Crisis: Mediations and Narratives

5:00 – 5:30 pm: Closing Discussion

Studying Stotras across Traditions: A Symposium

Studying Stotras across Traditions: A Symposium

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Conference Room 5

Organizer – Hamsa Stainton (McGill University)


Schedule

8.30 – 9 am – Introductions and Welcome

Panel 1: 9 – 10:15 am

10:15 – 10:30 am – Coffee Break

Panel 2: 10.30 am – 12.15 pm

12.15 – 01.45 pm – Lunch

Panel 3: 01.45 pm – 3.15 pm

3.30 – 3.45 pm – Coffee Break

Panel 4: 3:45 – 5:30 pm

Time, Scale, and Method in South Asian History

Worldmaking in Modern South Asia: Connected, Comparative, and Transnational Histories

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Matthew Shutzer (Harvard University)


Schedule

Political Imaginaries of Decolonization

N.G. Ranga, Dinah Stock and Afro-Asian Solidarity in a New World Order
Aditya Balasubramanian (ANU)

Settler Utopianism and the Post-Colony
Jessica Namakkal (Duke)

TBD
Faridah Zaman (Oxford)

Material Economies

Appraising Weather
Debjani Bhattacharyya (Drexel)

Children of the Poppy: Opium and the Proletarian Family in Industrial Bombay
Johan Mathew (Rutgers)

Nationalist Energies, Machines of Development: Ecology and the Limits of Liberal Economism
Matthew Shutzer (UC Berkeley)

Scales of Accumulation

A free India can be nothing but a republic: Jawaharlal Nehru and Indian republicanism in late colonial India.
Sunil Purushottam (Fairfield)

Back to the Future?: Reflections on Marxism, Anti-colonial Nationalism and Identity Politics
Viren Murthy (UW-Madison)

Big Bombay Boys: Anti-colonial Nationalism and the Appropriation of Capital
Meghna Chaudhuri (Boston College)

Mutations of Sovereignty: Perspectives on Sanjib Baruah’s In the Name of the Nation

Mutations of Sovereignty: Perspectives on Sanjib Baruah’s In the Name of the Nation

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Amit R. Baishya (University of Oklahoma)


Schedule

8.30-8.45: Welcome and Introduction (Amit R. Baishya)

Panel 1 (8.45-10.15): The Nation-Form and Its Margins

Sean Dowdy (University of Chicago)—”In the Name of the Father: Northeast India and Problems of National Kinship”

Soibam Haripriya (Ghent University)—”Rehabilitation Camps, Hybrid Regimes and the Making of the Ethnic Nation.”

Sneha Khaund (Rutgers University)—“In the Name of National Literature: Multilingual Literary Mobilities in Northeast India’

10.15-10.30—Coffee Break

Panel 2 (10.30-12.15)— Sovereignty and its Mutations

Mona Bhan (Syracuse University)—“Emptiness, Forever Assets and the Production of National Time.”

Lydia Walker (Leiden University)—”Northeast India as Ground Zero: Statehood, Sovereignty, and Citizenship in the Postcolonial World”

Abhilash Medhi (Mt. Holyoke College)— “Itinerancy, Tirni, Usury: a Counter-history of Sovereignty on the Indo-Afghan frontier.”

Amit R. Baishya (University of Oklahoma)—“‘What the Temporary ‘State of Emergency’ is to Time, Elastic Geographies are to Space’: Baruah’s Considerations of Emergency and Ad-Hoc Space in his Oeuvre.”

Lunch Break (12.15-1.30)

Panel 3 (1.30-3.00): Resource Frontiers

Bengt Karlsson (Stockholm University)—”Destroying One’s Own home: Resource Frontiers and Indigenous Governance in Northeast India.”

Alf Nilsen (University of Pretoria)—“Contesting Resources, Contesting the Nation.”

Tanmoy Sharma (Yale University)—“Seeing Through the State in Northeast India”

Break: 3.00-3.15

Panel 4 (3.15-4.45): Antinomies of Citizenship; Matters of Migration

Ahona Panda (University of Chicago)— “Politics Through Other Means: Moral Sovereignty and Citizenship Practices in South Asia”

Navine Murshid (Colgate University)—“Citizenship in the Time of Aspirational Development”

Mabel Gergan (Vanderbilt University)—”The Entanglements of Frontier-Making and Racialization in the Eastern Himalayas”

4.45-5.00–Break

5.00-6.00—Response by Sanjib Baruah and concluding discussion.

Print, Representation, and Formation of Bhakti in the Long 19th Century

Print, Representation, and Formation of Bhakti in the Long 19th Century

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Jon Keune (Michigan State)


Schedule

8:30-8:45amWelcome, Thematic Introduction

8:45-10:15amFormations

10:15-10:30am Coffee Break

10:30-12:15pm Debates

12:15-1:45pmLunch

1:45-3:30pmBoundary Crossings

3:00-3:30pm – Panel 4 Sovereignty and its Mutations

3:30-3:45pm Coffee Break

3:45-5:00pm – Technologies

5:00-5:30pmReflections & Discussion

World History in Urdu

World History in Urdu

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Walter Hakala (University at Buffalo)


Schedule

8:30-8:45amWelcome and Introductory Remarks

8:45-10:15amPanel One

10:15-10:30am Coffee Break

10:30-12:15pm Panel Two

12:15-1:45pmLunch

1:45-3:30pmPanel Three

3:30-3:45pm – Coffee Break

3:45-5:30pm Roundtable Discussion

New Directions in the Study of the Vernacular Millennium

New Directions in the Study of the Vernacular Millennium

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Co-Organizers – Ilanit Loewy Shacham (Tel Aviv University) and Harshita Mruthinti Kamath (Emory University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 a.m.: Introductions

8:45 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.: Session 1

Andrew Ollett, University of Chicago
“The Return of the Repressed”

Ilanit Loewy Shacham, Tel Aviv University and Harshita Mruthinti Kamath, Emory University
“Vernacular Beginnings: Perspectives from Classical Telugu Literature”

Jamal Jones, University of Wisconsin-Madison
“The Poetics of Tradition in 14th Century Telugu Literature”

9:45 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.: Break

10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.: Session 2

Elaine Fisher, Stanford University
“Internal Multilingualism and the Telugu Vernacular at Srisailam”

Sarah Pierce Taylor, University of Chicago Divinity School
“Loving at a Distance: Andhra Through the Eyes of Old Kannada Poets”

Ofer Peres, Hebrew University of Jerusalem
“The Devotional Eroticism of the Sneaky God in Seventeenth-Century Tamil Nadu”

11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.: Break

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.: Session 3

Sivan Goren Arzony, Harvard University
“Your Moon Face: Astrology and Aesthetics in Maḻamaṅgalakavi’s The Naiṣadha in Our Language”

Anand Venkatkrishnan, University of Chicago Divinity School
“Sensitive Readings: Nārāyaṇa and the Art of Commentary in Premodern Kerala”

Aleksander Uskokov, Yale University
“The Black Sun That Destroys Inner Darkness: Or How Bādarāyaṇa Became Vyāsa”

South Asia In Motion: mobility | movement | bodies

South Asia In Motion: mobility | movement | bodies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Daniel Dillon (University of Texas at Austin)


Schedule

8:30-10:15amIntroductory Session

10:15-10:30am All Conference Break

10:30-12:15pm Panel Theme: Senses in Motion

12:15-1:45pmLunch

1:45-3:30pmPanel Theme: Borders in Motion

3:30-3:45pmAll Conference Break

3:45-5:00pm Panel Theme: (Re)Production in Motion

5:00-5:30pmClosing Session

Seals and Sealings of South Asia: Indus to Early Historic Period

Seals and Sealings of South Asia: Indus to Early Historic Period

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizer – Jonathan Mark Kenoyer (University of Wisconsin-Madison)


Schedule

8:40-9:00amSpeaker 1: The Power of Multiples? Form, Function, and Iconography of the Small Molded Artifacts of the Indus Civilization (Ameri, Marta)

9:00-9:20amSpeaker 2: There and Back Again: Deconstructing the Indus-related seals found beyond the Harappan world (Frenez, Dennys)

9:20-9:40amSpeaker 3: Inscribed Seals from Gujarat: New Insights into Carving Styles, Production Techniques, Chronology and Regional Variation in the Indus Civilization (Jamison, Gregg)

9:40-10:00amSpeaker 4: Seals and Inscribed objects from Gandi Umar Khan, Gomal Plain, Pakistan (Jan, Zakurullah)

10:00-10:20amSpeaker 5: Changes and Continuities in Seal Carving Techniques: Function and Artistry of the Indus and Indo-Gangetic Traditions (Kenoyer, J. Mark)

10:20-10:40amBreak

10:40-11:00amSpeaker 6: The Chronology of Indus Seal Production in the Ghaggar Basin: Microscopic and Experimental Analyses (Konosukawa, A.)

11:00-11:20amSpeaker 7: Observations on the manufacture and raw material provenience of Indus Civilization seals (Law, Randall)

11:20-11:40amSpeaker 8: Hard Stone Seal Carving Technology: Comparing Mycenaean and Indo-Greek Techniques (Ludvik, Geoffrey)

11:40-12:00pmSpeaker 9: Lakhan-Jo-Daro Seals, Sealing, and inscribed objects (Mallah, Qasid)

12:00-1:20pmLunch

1:20-1:40pm –  Speaker 10: Harappan Seals and Sealings from Bagasra and Shikarpur: Preliminary Observations (Pottentavida, A.)

1:40-2:00pmSpeaker 11: Inscribed Materials from the Harappan Site of Karanpura, Rajasthan (Prabhakar, V. N.)

2:00-2:20pmSpeaker 12: Seals from Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan: Indus to Early Historic Period (Samad, Abdul)

2:20-2:40pmSpeaker 13: Bactro-Margiana Seals and Indus Motifs: A Unique Seal from Pakistan (Shakirullah)

2:40-3:00pmBreak

3:00-3:20pmSpeaker 14: Seals of the Indus Valley Civilization: A contextual approach to script (Zaid, Sareeta)

3:20-3:50pmEND

South Asia Translation Workshop

South Asia Translation Workshop

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Virtual

Organizers – Aliya Ram (Princeton University) and Meher Ali (Princeton University)

This Google Drive contains the texts for all three workshops. Attendees are asked to review them before the symposium.


Schedule

8:30 AM – 10:30 AM: Hindi  

Text: साँपों के बीच (Saapon Ke Beech) by Anita Bharati

Workshop Leader: Snehal Singhavi (Associate Professor of English, UT-Austin)

Robert Phillips (Lecturer in South Asian Studies, Princeton)

Joya John (Assistant Professor of Literature, Krea University)

Akhil Veetil (Graduate Student, Comparative Literature, University of Pennsylvania)

Aliya Ram (Graduate Student, Comparative Literature, Princeton University)

1 PM – 3 PM: Bangla 

Text: বাঙালি মুসলমানের মন (Bangali Mosulmaner Mon) by Ahmed Sofa

Workshop Leader: Asif Iqbal (Graduate Student, Michigan State University)

Ahona Panda (Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Claremont McKenna College)

Calynn Dowler (Graduate Student in Anthropology, Boston University)

Sourit Bhattacharya (Lecturer in Postcolonial Studies, University of Glasgow)

3:30 PM – 5:30 PM: Urdu 

Text: نقشِ فرنگ (Naqsh-i-farang) by Qazi Abdul Ghaffar

Workshop Leader: Matt Reeck (Translator in Residence, Princeton University)

Seton Uhlhorn (Graduate Student in South Asian Studies, Harvard University)

Zain Mian (Graduate Student in Comparative Literature, University of Pennsylvania)

Ishan Mehandru (Graduate Student in Comparative Literature, Northwestern University)

Meher Ali (Graduate Student in History, Princeton University)

Symposium Submission Guidelines

To propose a Symposium (formerly known as ‘PreConference’), you must submit:

  • A 200-300 word abstract
  • A preliminary list of speakers*
  • A preliminary schedule**
  • Justification of why the content of your proposed Symposium warrants more time than a panel or double-panel would allow

*We understand that your list of preliminary speakers and your proposed schedule may change following acceptance. Please do your best to give us a sense of who will be speaking (i.e. how many speakers, of which professional backgrounds, from which geographic regions, etc.) and what the schedule might look like when you submit your proposal (i.e. how much time is dedicated to presentations, audience discussion, breakout discussion, etc.).

**Your Symposium schedule must work around our all-conference breaks (7:30-8:30am, 10:15-10:30am, 3:30-3:45pm) and lunch (12:15-1:45pm).


Please note that you may request a 1/2 day or full day Symposium.

A full day Symposium runs from 8:30am to 5:30pm
A half day Symposium runs from 8:30am to 12:15pm or from 1:45 to 5:30pm


If you submit a Symposium and your submission is not accepted, you still have time to submit a Panel, Round Table, or Single Paper given the April 26 deadline for these submission types. All Symposium speakers must register for the conference by June 30. Registration refunds are offered through September 15 should your proposals not be accepted.

The Annual Conference on South Asia’s Symposia (formerly known as PreConference) offers half and full-day time slots during which presenters and participants can actively discuss more complex topics that would not be suitable to our shorter 105-minute panel format.

Half Day Symposia run from either 8:30am – 12:15pm or 1:45 – 5:30pm.
Full Day Symposia run from 8:30am – 5:30pm.

Your Symposium schedule must work with our all-conference breaks (7:30-8:30am, 10:15-10:30am, 3:30-3:45pm) and lunch (12:15-1:45pm).

Please note that your Symposium participants must register and submit payment upon your Symposium being accepted.

Please see our Conference Deadlines page for detailed information on important cutoff dates.

Submit Your Proposal Here!