Symposium – Wednesday, October 19th

The Annual Conference on South Asia’s Symposium (formerly known as PreConference) offers half and full-day time slots during which presenters and participants can actively discuss more complex topics that would not be suitable to our shorter 105-minute panel format.

All Symposia are open to registered conference attendees – Please see the below schedules to learn more about our exciting lineup this year!

Half Day Symposia run from either 8:30am – 12:15pm or 1:45 – 5:30pm CST.
Full Day Symposia run from 8:30am – 5:30pm CST.

Wednesday, October 19, 2022
All symposia held at Madison Concourse Hotel unless otherwise indicated

This is an accordion element with a series of buttons that open and close related content panels.

Rethinking Mantra Studies

Rethinking Mantra Studies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Caucus Room

Organizer – Gudrun Buhnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Organizer – Finnian Gerety (Brown University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 AM Welcome and Opening Remarks

8:45 AM – 10:15 AM Panel 1
John Nemec (University of Virginia) What do Mantras Denote?
Srilata Raman (University of Toronto) Encoding and Deciphering the Sectarian Mantra – Śaivasiddhānta and Śrīvaiṣṇava Perspectives from the 14th century
Gudrun Bühnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Visible Mantras in North Indian Vaiṣṇava Traditions
Dheepa Sundaram (University of Denver) Customizing mantras, packaging rituals: How digital apps are incentivized to reconfigure the authenticity and efficacy of Hindu sacred spaces

10:15 – 10:30 AM All-Conference Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel 2
Hillary Langberg (Bard College) Gender, Mantras, and the Rise of the Maṇḍala-focused Praxis in Early Indian Buddhist Tantra (ca. sixth century CE)
Richard Davis (Bard College) The Śaiva Body of Mantras
Ellen Gough (Emory University) Gods and Kings Worship the Jina: Sakalīkaraṇa in Jainism
Respondent: Gudrun Bühnemann (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

12:00 – 1:45 PM Lunch Break

1:45 – 3:15 PM Panel 3
Nell S. Hawley (Harvard University) Mouth to Mouth: Mantras and Intimacy in the Mahābhārata
Marko Geslani (University of South Carolina) Jyotiḥśāstra’s Mantraśāstra
Brian Hatcher (Tufts University) On the early Brahmo mantra
Respondent: Finnian M. Moore-Gerety (Brown University)

3:30 – 3:45 All-Conference Break

3:45 – 5:15 PM Panel 4
Finnian M. Moore Gerety (Brown University) From the Heart to the Head: Towards a Genealogy of the Tantric uccāra
Ayesha A. Irani (University of Massachusetts, Boston) Invoking Nirañjana, the Immaculate Lord: Jikir and Mantra Meditation in Bengali Sufi Praxis
Puninder Singh (University of Michigan) ੴ, ek oṃkār, the bīj mantra of the Sikh tradition, in philosophical and pragmatic perspectives
Respondent: Srilata Raman (University of Toronto)

5:15 – 5:30 PM Concluding Discussion

Hindu Economicus

Hindu Economicus

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Senate Room B

Organizer – Cassie Adcock (Washington University in St. Louis)
Organizer – Deonnie Moodie (University of Oklahoma)


Schedule

8.30 – 8:45 AM Welcome and Opening Remarks

8:45 – 10:15 AM 
William Gould (University of Leeds, United Kingdom) and Saarang Narayan (University of Leeds, United KingdomHindu Nationalism, Swadeshi and the Politics of Development in India
Ravinder Kaur (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)
Paper title TBA
Respondent: Deonnie Moodie (University of Oklahoma)

10:15 – 10:30 AM Coffee Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM 
Namita Dharia (Rhode Island School of Design) Urban Kin: religion and the urban development politics of Gurugram, India
Deonnie Moodie (University of Oklahoma) Management Science and the Self: American Imperialism and Hindu Modes of Management at India’s IIMs
Respondent: Mircea Raianu (University of Maryland)

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM 
Cassie Adcock (Washington University in St. Louis) Blood, Soil, and Grain: Cow Protection and the Drain of Wealth
Mytheli Srinivas (Ohio State University) Population, Poverty and the Biopolitics of Development: Imagining the Happy, Heterosexual, Hindu Family in mid-20th century India 
Respondent: Nishant Shahani (Washington State University)

3:30 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM 
Charu Gupta (University of Delhi, India) Anatomy of a Political Sanyasi: Freedom, Fitness and Finance in Satyadev Parivrajak’s Writings
Respondent: Cassie Adcock (Washington University in St. Louis)

Closing Discussion

 

Critical Contours of Maithili Studies

Critical Contours of Maithili Studies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Conference Room 2

Organizer – Pranav Prakash (Christ Church, University of Oxford)
Organizer – Coralynn Davis (Bucknell University)
Organizer – Christopher Diamond (Australian National University)

Abstracts for symposium presenters available here.


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Panel: Disciplinary Histories in Perspective

10:15 – 10:30 AM Coffee Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel: Maithili Literary Cultures in History

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Panel: Political and Religious Identities of Maithils

3:30 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

3:45 – 5;30 PM Panel: Performative and Visual Cultures in Mithila

Scheduled Speakers (listed alphabetically by surname)
Coralynn V. Davis (Bucknell University) Collaborative Scholarship and the Politics of Participation in a Project Linking Expressive Arts Social Change in Mithila
Christopher L. Diamond (Australian National University) A Torrent of Songs: Locana Das’ Rāgataraṅgiṇī, the Darbhanga Raj, and the Making of the Maithili Tradition
Hélène Fleury (Université Paris Saclay, France) Transnational Discursive Shifts on Mithila Paintings: Towards a (postcolonial) Inclusive Feminism?
Mithilesh Kumar Jha (Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati, India) Vidyapati’s Purush Pariksha and Its Rediscoveries in Early Twentieth-Century
Rani Jha (Independent Scholar) Expanding Poetic Voice in Contemporary Madhubani
Makoto Kitada (Osaka University, Japan) Jagatprakāśa Malla’s Grief to His Bosom Friend: Affection Expressed in Maithili and Newari
Ufaque Paiker (Ashoka University, India) Muslim Singes of Maithili Mars̱īya in Nineteenth Century Bihar
Dev Nath Pathak (South Asian University, India) A Ghummakad of Modern Mithila: An Interpretative Reading of Nagarjun’s Literary and Socio-Political Personhood
Pranav Prakash (Christ Church, University of Oxford) The Ethics of Literary Historiography: As Revealed by a Cowherd Playwright’s Chapbook
Paula Richman (Oberlin College) Mithila [ritual] Painting and Modern Indian Painting: When Does a Handicraft Become Modern?

New Directions in the Vernacular Millennium: Meter, Prose, and Aesthetics

New Directions in the Vernacular Millennium: Meter, Prose, and Aesthetics

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Conference Room 3

Organizer – Harshita Mruthinti Kamath (Emory University)
Organizer – Ilanit Loewy Shacham (Tel Aviv University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 AM Opening Remarks

8:45 – 10:15 AM Session 1: Maṇipravāḷam and Tamil Vernaculars

Suganya Anandakichenin (Universitat Hamburg) Commenting on the Rāmāyaṇa in the Vernacular: A look at Taṉiślokam, Periyavāccāṉ Piḷḷai’s Masterpiece
Sivan Goren Arzony (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) Mangos, Coconuts, Scabbards, and Lime: Lists in Maṇipravāḷam Prose
Ofer Peres (Heidelberg University) Land, Town, Temple: The Aesthetics of the Lyrical Preludes in Tamil Talapurāṇams

10:15 – 10:30 AM Coffee Break

10:30 – 12:15 PM Session 2: Sanskrit and its Vernacular Interactions

Naresh Keerthi (Ashoka University) A Florilegium for her Rival’s Wedding: Tirumalamba’s Polythetic Prabandha
Jamal Jones (University of Wisconsin-Madison) The Magic of Taming a Poet in the Vernacular Millennium
Elaine Fisher (Stanford University) Religion and the ‘Literary Antiform’: Rupture and Continuity in Early Vīraśaivism

12:00 – 1:45 PM Lunch

2:00 – 3:30 PM Session 3: Kannada and Telugu Vernaculars

Sarah Pierce Taylor (University of Chicago) The Speed of Prose and the Pace of Narrative in Old Kannada Literature
Andrew Ollett (University of Chicago) Verse Forms, Genre, and Register in Early Kannada literature
Ilanit Loewy Schacham (Tel Aviv University) and Harshita Mruthinkti Kamath (Emory University) The Vernacular Turn in Nannaya’s Use of Telugu Meter

3:30 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

4:00 – 5:00 PM Session 4: Final Roundtable

On Representing Crisis in South Asian Visual Culture: Intermedial Histories, Strategies, and Methodologies

On Representing Crisis in South Asian Visual Culture: Intermedial Histories, Strategies, and Methodologies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Conference Room 4

Organizer – Anuja Jain (Wesleyan University)


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Panel: New Cartographies of Crisis: Pandemic to CAA-NRC Protests

Suraj Yengde (Harvard University) New Icons and Visual Metaphors? Ambedkar and CAA protests
Shayoni Mitra (Barnard College) A New Verse: Embodiment and Protest Poetry in the 21st Century
Kajri Jain (University of Toronto) Ecology as allegory: the Manyawar Shri Kanshiram Ji Green Eco Garden
Jyotsna Kapur (Southern Illinois University) You dig nails, we will plant flowers:  How the farmers protest countered the fascist imaginary?

10:15 – 10:30 AM – Coffee Break

10:30 – 12:15 PM – Materialities of Dissent

Anuja Jain (Wesleyan University) New Media Overtures: Video Art and Militant Hindu Nationalism in India
Lotte Hoek (Edinburgh University) Artists’ film and new political proximities in contemporary Bangladesh
Ritika Kaushik (University of Chicago) “Situation Normal…”: Staging the Indian Emergency in Films Division of India’s We Have Promises to Keep/Naya Daur (1975)
Swarnavel Eswaran (Michigan State University) Filmmaker’s Notes: Catamaran and Waves of Dissonance

12:15 – 1:45 PM – Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM – Questions of Gender and Caste: Cinematic Mappings and Modalities

Anjali Arondekar (University of California, Santa Cruz) Intimations of Dissent: Sexuality’s Protest
Navaneetha Mokkil (Jawaharlal Nehru University) Visualizing Laboring Bodies: Politics of Discomfort
Anuradha Needham (Oberlin College) Utopian Imagining(s) and/or Patriarchy in Crisis: “Modern” Woman in Post-independence Indian Cinema
Kavita Daiya (George Washington University) Visualizing Secularism: Displacement and Gender in South Asia

3:30 – 3:45 PM – Coffee Break

3:45 – 5:00 PM – Specters of Crisis: Mediations and Narratives

Rochona Mazumdar (University of Chicago) Anger and Aftermath: Women and Mrinal Sen’s Cinema
Sangita Gopal (University of Oregon) Pandemic Noir: Malayalam Film and Planetary Crisis
Deepti Misri (University of Colorado, Boulder) Paradise Lost? Narrating Pandit loss in Ghar ka Pata

5:00 – 5:30 PM Closing Discussion

Studying Stotras Across Traditions: A Symposium

Studying Stotras Across Traditions: A Symposium

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Conference Room 5

Organizer – Hamsa Stainton (McGill University)
Organizer – Anna Lee White (McGill University)


Schedule

8.30 – 9:00 AM Introductions and Welcome Remarks

9:00 – 10:15 AM Session 1
Hamsa Stainton (McGill University) Navigating an Ocean of Hymns: Popular Stotra Anthologies in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
Lynna Dhanani (University of California-Davis) An Epistemology of Stotra: Hemancandra’s Understanding of the Hymnic Genre
David Buchta (Brown University) Virudāvalī Praise Poems in Kṛṣṇa Temples and Mughal Courts

10:15 – 10:30 AM Coffee Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Session 2
Matthew Leveille (University of Virginia) Blending Diametric Streams: Cross-fertilizations of Śaiva and Vaiṣṇava Terms and Theologies in Appayya Dīkṣita’s Hymns to Viṣṇu and Śiva
Vishal Sharma (University of Oxford) Arguing through Praise: The Polemical Stotras of the Medieval Śrīvaiṣṇavas and Śaivas
Steven P. Hopkins (Swarthmore College) Response paper

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Session 3
Anna Lee White (McGill University) Stotras to Hanuman in the Ramanandi Sampradāy 
Ben Williams (Naropa University) Liturgies of Awareness in Krama Stotra Literature
John Cort (Denison University) Stotra and Liturgy: Sets of Hymns within Jain Ritual Cycles

3:30 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM Session 4, Concluding Remarks and Discussion
Talia Ariav (University of Chicago) Articulating Selves through Devotional Poetry: Stotras of Nīlakaṇtha Dīkṣita and Rāmabhadra Dīkṣita
Ralph H. Craig III (Stanford University) Praise You Like I Should: Verses of Praise in relation to the dharmabhāṇaka in Mahāyāna Buddhist sūtras
Hamsa Stainton (McGill University) Response paper

Decentering India from South Asian Studies

Decentering India from South Asian Studies

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, University A/B

Organizer – Hafsa Kanjwal (Lafayette College)


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Panel One: Rethinking Temporality and Territoriality

Rajbir Singh Judge (California State University, Long Beach) Is Hinduism Christian?
Mohamad Junaid (Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts) On Indian “Innocence” and “Hiding”: Reflections on the Postcolonial Empire in Kashmir
Arvind-Pal Mandair (University of Michigan) Reclaiming “Epistemic Sovereignty”: Diasporcizing Philosophy and Area Studies
Dean Accardi (Connecticut College) Remapping Geosocial Imaginaries and Transreligious Temporalities

10:15 – 10:30 AM Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel Two: Challenging The Secular Episteme

Suvaid Yaseen (Mt. Holyoke College) Rethinking Islam in Colonial Era Kashmir
Parvinder Mehta (Wayne State University) Sikh Otherness and the Secular Episteme: Questions of Critique & Discontent
Iymon Majid (Independent Scholar) The Sun Rises in the West, Sets in East: The Im(possibility) of Kashmir Studies
Amrit Deol (Fresno State University) Forgetting India: Thinking Beyond the Secular/Non-secular Divide in Punjab and Its History

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Panel: Solidarity Across Difference: Beyond Liberal Models of Tolerance

Randeep Singh Hothi (University of Michigan) Alliances in Diaspora: On Transnational Punjabi Sikh and Kashmiri Muslim Solidarities
Sanober Umar (York University) “Killing In The Name Of”
Khushdeep Kaur Malhotra (Temple University) “Sikh toh hamare apne hai” (The Sikhs Are Our Own): Unpacking Sikh-Muslim Solidarities in Kashmir
Hafsa Kanjwal (Lafayette College) Islam, Solidarity, and the Question of Kashmir

3:30 – 3:45 PM Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM Audience Discussion

Provincializing Brahmins: New Directions in the Study of Caste in Premodern South Asia

Provincializing Brahmins: New Directions in the Study of Caste in Premodern South Asia

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, University C/D

Organizer – Eric Gurevitch (Vanderbilt University)
Organizer – Seema Chauhan (Balliol College, University of Oxford)


Schedule

8:40 – 8:45 AM Welcome & Opening Remarks, Seema Chauhan (University of Oxford) & Eric Gurevitch (Vanderbilt University)

8:40 – 10:15 AM Rethinking the origins of caste
Moderator: Seema Chauhan
Audrey Truschke (Rutgers University) A History of India with Caste
Caley Smith (Harvard University) Varṇa as a Lagging Indicator of Yaśas
Nathan McGovern (University of Wisconsin-Whitewater) Rethinking “Mixed Castes”: Provincializing Brahmins in the Dharmaśāstra Literature

10:15 – 10:45 AM Coffee Break

10:45 AM – 12:15 PM The Institutions of Caste
Moderator: Eric Gurevitch
Whitney Cox (University of Chicago) Dūre brāhmanabhāvah: Multiple Brahmanisms in the 11th century Kaveri delta
Nabanjan Maitra (Bard College) Trickle-down Mīmāṃsā: Vedic Hermeneutics and the Universalization of Monastic Power
Jason Schwartz (Stanford University) The path beyond caste: Alternative models of disciplinarity and governmentality in the Western Deccan

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch Break

1:45 – 3:15 PM Caste in the Vernacular
Moderator: Caley Smith
Jason William Smith (Mercer University) The Presence and Absence of Caste in the Tirukkuṟaḷ
Heleen De Jonckheere (The School of Oriental and African Studies) Translating the Brahmin other in the Dharmapariksa
Rabi Prakash (Thapar School of Liberal Arts and Science, Patiala) The Mughal Politics of Watan Jagir and Reclamation of Kshatriya Identity in Early Modern India

3:30 – 3:45 PM Coffee Break

3:45 – 4:45 PM Disputing Brahminism from the Outside
Moderator: Whitney Cox
Seema Chauhan (University of Oxford) Don’t kill the Brahmins! (mā haṇa māhaṇā): Religion, Language and Caste in Jaina narratives
Eric Gurevitch (Vanderbilt University) The Epistemology of Difference from the Center of Political Power

4:45 – 5:45 PM Concluding Roundtable Discussion
Moderator: Audrey Trushke

Urdu Poetics Symposium

Urdu Poetics Symposium

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Parlor Room 627

Organizer – Sean Pue (Michigan State University)
Organizer – Zahra Rizvi (Jamia Millia Islamia, Yale University)


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Social Life of the Urdu Ghazal
Gregory Maxwell Bruce (University of California)
Purnima Dhavan and Heidi Pauwels (University of Washington)
Zahra Sabri (IBA-Karachi)
Nathan Tabor (Western Michigan University)

10:15 – 10:30 AM Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Literary Forms and Modernity
Megan Robb (University of Pennsylvania)
Mehr Farooqi (University of Virginia)
Mustafa Menai (University of Pennsylvania)
Hamza Iqbal (University of Texas at Austin)

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Poetry, Song, and Elegy
Krupa Shandilya (Amherst College)
A. Sean Pue (Michigan State University)
Peter Knapczyk (Wake Forest University)
Zahra Rizvi (Jamia Millia Islamia, Yale University)

3:30 – 3:45 PM Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM Roundtable Discussion

AIIS Dissertation to Book Workshop

AIIS Dissertation to Book Workshop

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Parlor Room 629

Organizer – Sarah Lamb (Brandeis University)


Schedule

All meetings will take place at the Madison Concourse Hotel

· Tuesday evening, October 18, 7:00 to 8:30 pm: Secrets of Publishing: Introductions and Q&A regarding publishing, next steps, etc. Several faculty mentors with experience recruiting manuscripts for presses and publishing their own books will participate. Light refreshments will be served.

· Wednesday morning, October 19, 8:30 am to 12:15 pm (with a coffee break from 10:15-10:30 am): We will divide into three groups of 8-9 authors and 3 mentors. Each project will be discussed for 23-25 minutes. In advance, everyone will read all of the materials for their group. For each 23-25-minute segment, one participant will make a 3-5-minute presentation on someone else’s project, and then the other participants will join in to discuss the project—except the project’s author, who is not allowed to speak. The author of the project under discussion can only listen, take notes, and record if desired, how their project is being understood, misunderstood, stretched, queried, critiqued, and praised by knowledgeable peers with closely related interests but working in varying theoretical perspectives, disciplines, settings, and time periods.

· Lunch break (on one’s own): 12:15 to 1:45 pm

· Wednesday afternoon, 1:45 to 5:30 pm (with a coffee break from 3:30-3:45): Each author is given a 23-25-minute time slot to respond to the more important queries, issues, and suggestions raised in the morning, and, most important, to seek feedback or further discussion of areas of their project with which they recognize they are having difficulty.

· Wednesday evening at 6:30 pm: AIIS will host all participants at a group dinner at the Maharani Indian Restaurant, 380 W. Washington Street (several blocks from the Concourse Hotel) (final restaurant choice to be confirmed).

 

Conversations can carry over into Thursday, Friday and Saturday at the South Asia Conference!

Author proposals for this annual workshop are due each year by July 31. For more information, see: https://www.indiastudies.org/book-prize/dissertation-to-book-workshop/

 

In 2022, the senior mentors will include: Sarah Lamb (convener, Anthropology, Brandeis U), Ulka Anjaria (English, Brandeis U), Shalini Ayyagari (Music, U of Pittsburgh), Srimati Basu (Gender & Women’s Studies, Anthropology, U of Kentucky), Nitin Govil (Cinematic Arts, USC), Rachel McDermott (Asian & Middle Eastern Cultures, Religion, Barnard C/Columbia U), Mubbashir Rizvi (Anthropology, American U), Cynthia Talbot (History, UT-Austin), and Anand Yang (History, U of Washington).

Global Imaginations, Local Texts: South Asia and the World

Global Imaginations, Local Texts: South Asia and the World

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Parlor Room 634

Organizer – Supurna Dasgupta (University of Chicago)
Organizer – Jaideep Pandey (University of Michigan)


Schedule

8:30 – 10:15 AM Panel 1 Migrant Histories and Migrant Texts

B. Venkat Mani (University of Wisconsin-Madison) World Literature, Global History, and the Question of RAce
Sthira Bhattacharya (University of Chicago) Repurposing genres for caste journals in early 20th c. colonial India
Manav Kapur (Princeton University) (Dis)possessions: Property Documents in South Asia and the World

10:15 – 10:30 AM Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Panel 2 Travelling Genres and (Dis)Orientations

Davesh Soneji (University of Pennsylvania) Waterborne Tunes: Tamil Kirttanai as Transoceanic Musical Form
Maryam Fatima (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) A Worldly Social Realism: The Progressive Writers Movement at Lotus
Supurna Dasgupta (University of Chicago) World Poetry and Counterculture: Two Stories of Bengali Bohemianism

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

1:45 – 3:30 PM Panel 3  Aesthetic Worlds and Worldly Aesthetics

Iftikhar Dadi (Cornell University) The Global in the Global ‘60s Lahore Cinema
Debashree Mukherjee (Columbia University) Mumbai to Mauritius: The Girl Who Sat on a Plane and Went to the Land of Chillies
Jaideep Pandey (University of Michigan) Ishq and Global Desires: Iqbal’s Spain Poems and World Literature

3:30 – 3:45 PM Break

3:45 – 5:30 PM Discussion and Concluding Roundtable

Sensing Bhakti - Regional Bhakti Scholars Network Symposium

Sensing Bhakti – Regional Bhakti Scholars Network Symposium

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Parlor Room 638

Organizer – Bhakti Mamtora (College of Wooster)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 AM Symposium Meet and Greet

8:45 – 9:00 AM Symposium Opening Remarks

9:00 – 10:15 AM Session 1: Seeing through Unseeing the Divine
Heidi Pauwels (University of Washington) Lovers Celebrating Lovers: Bhakti, Sensuality, and Synesthesia in Song and Image in Kishangarh
Nancy Martin (Chapman University) The Taste and Scent, Sight, and Sound of Bhakti: Intersubjective Sensual Encounter with Divine Presence
Aalekhya Malladi (Emory University) When God Plays Hide and Seek: Affective and Ascetic Bhakti in a Telugu Yaksagana

10:15 – 10:30 AM All Conference Break

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM Session 2: Cultivated Sensations
Jack Hawley (Columbia University) Unseeing Eyes, But Cymbals in Hands
Tyler Williams (University of Chicago) The Scent of Liberation: Scent and Epistemology in Sant Devotion
Iva Patel (Augsburg University) Sensations Without Sensing: Making the Absent Present through Cognitive Actions in Swaminarayan Devotion

12:15 – 1:45 PM Lunch

2:00 – 3:30 PM Session 3: Curated Sensations
Afsar Mohammed (University of Pennsylvania) The Poetics of Touch: Telugu Sufi Narratives and the Question of Untouchability
Allan Life (UNC Chapel Hill) Maharani Jamnabai: Tradition and Innovation in a Photograph from Baroda
Amy Ruth-Holt (Independent Scholar) Sensational Poetics: The Modern Contextualities of Tiruvalluvar’s Tirukurral
Aarti Patel (Syracuse University) Sensory Engagement Within Domestic Religiosity

3:30 – 3:45 PM All Conference Break

3:45 – 5:00 PM Session 4: Technologies of Sensing
Karen Pechilis (Drew University) Revisiting the Sacred and the Sensual in Women’s Bhakti Poetry
Leah Comeau (University of the Sciences) Fresh Technologies: Ephemeral Offerings, and When to Sense the Sacred
Hanna Kim (Adelphi University) Sensing the BAPS Swaminarayan Guru: On Somatic Ways of Knowing or Overcoming Ethnographic Incommensurables in Bhakti Studies

5:00 – 5:30 PM Discussion

Discussions will continue informally over dinner

Science, Technology, and Medicine Symposium: Decolonizing STM

Science, Technology, and Medicine Symposium: Decolonizing STM

Session: Symposium – Half Day, morning
Venue: Concourse Hotel, Room 1409

Organizer – Shireen Hamza (Harvard University)
Organizer – Kiran Kumbhar (Harvard University)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:45 AM Introductions

8:45 – 10:15 AM Discussion 1: Science, Religion, Nation

10:15 – 10:30 AM Break

10:30 – 12:00 PM Discussion 2: Geographies and Chronologies of Science

12:00 – 12:15 PM Closing Discussion

12:15 PM Working lunch and planning session for 2023 organizers of the STM Symposium

The format for these discussion groups will be as follows: 30 minutes in small groups, followed by full group discussion. Organizers will solicit volunteers to record portions of the conversations on a shared Google document, available to all participants. Attendees will be invited to add to the document and other shared digital resources during or after the symposium.

Scheduled Participants:

Shireen Hamza (Harvard University)
Kiran Kumbhar (Yale University)
Nayanika Ghosh (Harvard University)
Arnav Bhattacharya (University of Pennsylvania)
Minakshi Menon (Max Planck Institute)
Sarah Aurelia Carson (Northwestern University)
Mallika Leuzinger (Princeton University)
Sarah Qidwai (University of Regensburg)
Joseph Alter (University of Pittsburgh)
Aidan Seale-Feldman (University of Notre Dame)
Arafaat Valiani (University of Oregon)
Archana Venkatesh (Clemson University)
Anthony Cerulli (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Salina Suri (Harvard University)
Sabrina Datoo (Hamilton College)
Amanda Lanzillo (Princeton University)
Marjan Wardaki (Yale University)
Sajdeep Soomal (University of Toronto)
Alok Srivastava (Independent Scholar)
Sayori Ghoshal (University of Toronto)
Shivani Kapoor (O.P. Jindal Global University)
Andrew Amstutz (University of Arkansas at Little Rock)
Lisa Brooks (University of California, Berkeley)
Namrata Ganenri (S.N.D.T. College, Mumbai)
Pratik Chakrabarti (University of Houston)
Sridhar Modugu (Tata Institute of Social Sciences)

Innovative Approaches to Traditional Archaeology in South Asia: Indus to Early Historic Periods

Innovative Approaches to Traditional Archaeology in South Asia: Indus to Early Historic Periods

Session: Symposium – Full Day
Venue: UW-Madison Campus, Social Sciences Building Room 8417

Organizer – J. Mark Kenoyer (University of Wisconsin-Madison)


Schedule

8:30 – 8:40 AM Welcome

8:40 – 10:20 AM Session 1

J. Mark Kenoyer (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Harappa, Mohenjo Daro and the Indus Tradition: Investigating the Origins of Urbanism, Social Hierarchy, and Technology
V.N. Prabhakar (IIT Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India) Understanding Archaeological Stratigraphy through Harris Matrix: A Case Study from Karanpura Excavations
Shi Lanying (Hebei Normal University, China) Excavations at Jhang Bahatar, Pakistan: Investigating Linkages Between the Indus Valley, Central Asia and Western China
Uzma Rizvi and Can Sucuoglu (Pratt Institute, New York) Data Visualization as New Forms of Inquiry: Revisiting Mohenjo Daro
Abdul Samad (Directorate of Archaeology, PKP, Pakistan) Researches and New Approaches in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (Ancient Gandhara) Archaeology

10:20 – 10:40 AM Break

10:40 AM – 12:00 PM Session 2
Shakir Ullah and Muhammad Zahoor (Hazara University, Mansehra, Pakistan) Evolution of Tape to Electronic Mapping in Pakistan’s Archaeology: A Case Study of Buddhist’s and Late Medieval Period Sites in District Mansehra, Pakistan
Richard Meadow, Kristine K. Richter and Sebastian Millien (Harvard University) Mammalian Faunal Remains from Harappa, Pakistan: Combining Old and New Methods of Analysis
Ajitprasad Pottentavida (MS University Baroda, Gujarat, India) Harappan Archaeology in Gujarat, India: New Approaches to Subsistence and Urbanism
Asma Ibrahim (State Bank Museum, Karachi, Pakistan) Engaging the Public in Museums: The Sawda Project in Karachi and Manchester

12:00 – 1:20 PM Lunch

1:20 – 3:00 PM Session 3
William Belcher (University of Nebraska, Lincoln) New Perspectives on Maritime Trade and Seasonality Between the Indus Civilization and Oman: A Fishy Perspective
Brian Hemphill (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) Population Dynamics among Ethnic Groups Residing in Hazarewal and Chitral-Gilgit-Baltistan: A Dental Morphology Investigation of Biological Interactions across the Northwestern Borderlands of South Asia since the Chalcolithic Era
Kuldeep Bhan (MS University Baroda, Gujarat, India) Harappan Shell Production in Gujarat, Harappan Shell Production in Gujarat, Western India: Raw Material, Stock Piling, Activity Areas, and Workshops
Gregg Jamison (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee at Waukesha) and Akinori Uesugi (Kanazawa University, Japan) Seals of the Indus Tradition: New Perspectives on Diachronic Variation, Organization, and Integration
Ayumu Konasukawa (Kyoto University) Indus Seal Production in the Ghaggar Basin: Microscopic and Experimental Analyses

3:00 – 3:20 PM Break

3:40 – 5:00 PM Session 4
Brad Chase (Albion College) and R.W. Law (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Innovation in the Study of Harappan Steatite Beads: Reconstructing the Creation and Circulation of Value in the Indus Civilization
Dennys Frenez (University of Bologna, Italy) The Indus Civilization External Trade: Hints of a ‘Global’ Marketing Strategy?
Randall Law (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Sources of Silver in the Indus Civilization: New Analyses and Interpretations
Monica Smith (University of California, Los Angeles) The Red and the Black: Labor Investment and the Social Outcomes of Differential Pottery Production at the Early Historic City of Sisupalgarh
Kaleemullah Lashari (Department of Heritage, Sindh, Pakistan) From Mukhi House to Museum of the Recent Past: Salvaging the Past for the Present

Symposium Submission Guidelines

To propose a Symposium (formerly known as ‘PreConference’), you must submit:

  • A 200-300 word abstract
  • A preliminary list of speakers*
  • A preliminary schedule**
  • Justification of why the content of your proposed Symposium warrants more time than a panel or double-panel would allow

*We understand that your list of preliminary speakers and your proposed schedule may change following acceptance. Please do your best to give us a sense of who will be speaking (i.e. how many speakers, of which professional backgrounds, from which geographic regions, etc.) and what the schedule might look like when you submit your proposal (i.e. how much time is dedicated to presentations, audience discussion, breakout discussion, etc.).

**Your Symposium schedule must work around our all-conference breaks (7:30-8:30am, 10:15-10:30am, 3:30-3:45pm) and lunch (12:15-1:45pm).


Please note that you may request a 1/2 day or full day Symposium.

A full day Symposium runs from 8:30am to 5:30pm
A half day Symposium runs from 8:30am to 12:15pm or from 1:45 to 5:30pm


If you submit a Symposium and your submission is not accepted, you still have time to submit a Panel, Round Table, or Single Paper given the April 26 deadline for these submission types. All Symposium speakers must register for the conference by June 30. Registration refunds are offered through September 15 should your proposals not be accepted.

The Annual Conference on South Asia’s Symposia (formerly known as PreConference) offers half and full-day time slots during which presenters and participants can actively discuss more complex topics that would not be suitable to our shorter 105-minute panel format.

Half Day Symposia run from either 8:30am – 12:15pm or 1:45 – 5:30pm.
Full Day Symposia run from 8:30am – 5:30pm.

Your Symposium schedule must work with our all-conference breaks (7:30-8:30am, 10:15-10:30am, 3:30-3:45pm) and lunch (12:15-1:45pm).

Please note that your Symposium participants must register and submit payment upon your Symposium being accepted.

Please see our Conference Deadlines page for detailed information on important cutoff dates.

Submit Your Proposal Here!